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National Young Worker Safety Resource Center

What is the National Young Worker Safety Resource Center

The National Young Worker Safety Resource Center (YWSRC) is a collaborative project of U.C. Berkeley's Labor Occupational Health Program (LOHP) and the Education Development Center, Inc. (EDC) in Massachusetts. The YWSRC provides training, technical assistance, and resource materials to state and community groups throughout the country. Click on the image below to download the brochure:

YW Safety Resource Center

Who does the National Young Worker Safety Resource Center serve?

What services does the Center provide?

What materials does the Center provide?

How do I contact the Center for more information?

What federal agencies promote young worker health safety?

How can I find agencies and organizations in my state?

Resources and forms for our partner agencies


Who does the National Young Worker Safety Resource Center serve?

  • State departments of labor, education, and health
  • School- and community-based job readiness and training programs, including:
  • - School-to-Career programs
    - Workforce Investment Boards
    - Jobs for America's Graduates
    - Transition-to-Work programs for youth with disabilities.

  • Employer organizations
  • Other education and employment-related organizations serving youth.

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What services does the Center provide?

Consultation and referrals for staff in state departments of education, labor, health, and workforce development, and other organizations that want to integrate young worker safety training into their programs.

Training of Teachers/Trainers. YWSRC staff are available to conduct half- to full-day training programs to teach teachers how to use the "Youth @ Work" curriculum. *

Follow-up assistance for trainers who conduct workshops for teens.

Presentations about youth employment for small business organizations.*

* Available on a fee-for-service basis.

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What materials does the Center provide?

talking safety logo

The Youth @ Work: Talking Safety curriculum includes instructor's notes and training materials for teaching youth basic job health and safety knowledge and skills, including youth with developmental and learning disabilities. The 3-5 hour curriculum covers how to recognize and reduce hazards in the workplace, employees' rights and responsibilities, emergency preparedness, and how to speak up about workplace concerns in an effective manner.

LOHP and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) have produced custom versions of Youth @ Work: Talking Safety for each state in the U.S. Each state version has specific information about the state's child labor laws, minimum wage, regulatory and resource agencies, etc. The state versions are available on the NIOSH website at www.cdc.gov/niosh/talkingsafety.


Small Business Resources. Resources for setting up an effective safety and health program that involves employees. Industry-specific packets with tip sheets for restaurants and janitorial services also available. Click here to view Small Business Resources.


Engaging Employers in Protecting Young Workers: Tips and Best Practices from the Young Worker Safety Resource Center
This guide provides strategies that young worker safety advocates in state and local agencies and organizations can use to increase employers' knowledge and capacity to prevent workplace injuries among their young workers. The booklet includes basic messages that employers need to understand, descriptions of potential partners for reaching employers and strategies that have been used to reach employers, including specific examples. Click here to download.


Powerpoint presentation, "Why is Job Health and Safety Training Important for Teens?"  Click here for a downloadable version.


Resource list of curricula, factsheets, and reports. Click here for a downloadable version of the list. Some of the key resources are also listed on this website's Resources & Links page.


Sample materials, including brochures, posters, curricula, and other educational materials developed by state and community groups around the country. Click here to see our gallery showing some of these samples.

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How do I contact the Center for more information?

Diane Bush,
Project Coordinator
Labor Occupational Health Program

University of California, Berkeley
2223 Fulton St., 4th Floor

Berkeley, CA 94720-5120
510-643-2424
dbush@berkeley.edu

Christine Miara,
EDC Project Coordinator
Education Development Center, Inc.

55 Chapel St.
Newton, MA 02458
617-618-2238

cmiara@edc.org

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What federal agencies promote young worker health & safety?

The U.S. Department of Labor

Two agencies within the U. S. Department of Labor (DOL), OSHA and Wage & Hour Division have websites for young workers and the adults responsible for their safety. These sites also have links to resources and contacts in each state.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) website also has information for young workers. Download the resource guide, Promoting Safe Work for Young Workers, for ideas on how to educate and protect young workers in your community.

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How can I find agencies and organizations in my state?

There are agencies and organizations in many states, and on a national level, that play a role in protecting and educating working teens. They often have materials and information available. Check our State Partners page for contacts.

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Resources and forms for our partner agencies

TOT Participant Form

Teaching Youth/ Payment Request Form

Student Evaluation Form

Student Sign In Form

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The material on this page was produced under the grant number 46JO-HT12 from the Occupational Safety Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products,or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.


Copyright 2010, Labor Occupational Health Program, UC Berkeley.
This page last modified: April 2010
Photos by: Rebecca Letz